264 Memorial Drive, Jacksonville, North Carolina   28546
800.682.2402 (toll free) 910.353.1030 (local)Price Eye Clinic
drprice@priceeye.com
  
Frequently Asked Questions
frequently asked questions

Is Dr. Price board certified?
What does board certified mean?
Who is Dr. Price?
Does my insurance company pay?
How can Price Eye Clinic perform the surgery at such a reasonable price?
What if my eye moves during surgery?
When can I go back to work?
Should I have one or both eyes done at the same time?
Is the correction permanent?
How long has Dr. Price been doing LASIK surgery?
What is “All laser, Laser Vision Correction”?
Who needs LASEK or ASA?
Who needs the Internal Contact Lens (ICL) surgery or clear lens surgery?


Is Dr. Price board certified?

Yes. Dr. Price is one of the few surgeons certified specifically in Laser Vision Correction.

What does board certified mean?

There are many boards in medicine. All medical doctors must be licensed by the State Medical Board to practice medicine. This is a state regulatory agency whose primary purpose is to protect the public from incompetent medical doctors. State licensure ensures that the physician did go to medical school and complete an internship. For physicians who specialize in ophthalmology the next hurdle is certification by the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) . Certification by the ABO means that the individual has completed an additional 3 years of training, specifically in ophthalmology, after medical school and internship. The ABO certified physician then passed both a written and oral examination. ABO certification means that the physician has the "book knowledge" to be a competent ophthalmologist. Finally, the ophthalmologist may achieve board certification by the American Board of Eye Surgery (ABES). Certification by ABES means that the physician has completed ABO certification, submitted data on a consecutive series of patients for review, has had an on site visit to audit those records and has had a video tape made of multiple eye surgeries. The results are then reviewed by peers for quality standards and certification is granted if earned. ABES certification means that the physician has successfully mastered the physical skills needed to perform high quality surgery.

Who is Dr. Price?

Dr. Kent Price was born and educated in Ohio. He completed ophthalmology training in Missouri in 1991 and moved to North Carolina. He has been in practice in Jacksonville since 1993. First as an associate of Carolina Eye Associates, then establishing Price Eye Clinic, P.A. in 1997. He is married with three children and an active member of First Baptist Church.

Does my insurance company pay for Laser Vision Correction, the Internal Collamer Lens (ICL), or the Crystalens?

Usually not, these procedures are considered cosmetic.

How can Price Eye Clinic provide the surgery at such a reasonable price?

There are several reasons. First, Dr. Price is the chief executive of the practice and runs a tight ship. Keeping overhead low is key to providing high quality low cost surgery. Second, Dr. Price performs his own post operative care and does not pay for referrals from optometrists or other ophthalmologists. Did you know that other surgeons providing Laser Vision Correction may pay as much as $800 to an optometrist for referring a patient? Keep this in mind when seeking advice from your optometrist and make sure he/she discloses any such arrangements. Third, Dr. Price believes a person should only pay for what they need. Some centers, charging thousands more, will offer free enhancements knowing that most patients will never need an enhancement.

What if my eye moves during surgery?

Price Eye Clinic utilizes the VISX S4 Active Trac laser. This laser actively tracks fine eye movements and moves the laser beam as the patient moves so that the ablation stays centered.

When can I go back to work?

Most patients who have LASIK surgery on Thursday can go back to work on Monday. Most patients who have ASA performed on one eye on Thursday can go back to work by Monday.

Should I have one or both eyes done at the same time?

Opinions vary among ophthalmologists. With single eye surgery, the patient has an eye that they can count on while the first eye recovers. However, doing single eye surgery means two treatment sessions and thus more time off work. Also, patients with single eye treatment may have a sense of imbalance until the second eye is done. Although honest debate exists, most patients chose to do both eyes at the same time. Dr. Price will abide by the patients wishes.

Is the correction permanent?

Yes. There are other procedures that treat farsightedness but the correction is not permanent.

How long has Dr. Price been doing LASIK surgery?

Dr. Price began performing refractive surgery in 1993. First performing Radial Keratotomy (RK) using a diamond knife and then Automated Lamellar Keratoplasty (ALK) using a keratome. In ALK, a corneal flap was created using a keratome, then the keratome was used a second time to remove a small amount of tissue. ALK worked well but given the imprecision of the keratome, enhancement rates were high. When the excimer laser was first approved in 1995, the original procedure was Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK). Dr. Price immediately saw the problems that went along with simple PRK. Immediately after surgery, the PRK patient is left with a large corneal abrasion. The abrasion can take several days to heal. Rarely, a patient can develop haze at the site of the ablation that decreases vision. Working with Carolina Eye Associates at the time, Dr.'s Brown and Price were the first doctors in eastern North Carolina to combine ALK and PRK to achieve the best that both procedures had to offer. ALK+PRK eventually became known as "Laser Assisted In-situ Keratomileusis" or LASIK. In short, "Dr. Price was LASIK before LASIK was cool."

What is “All laser, Laser Vision Correction”?

Years pass and the profession comes to realize that although LASIK is very convenient, it is not a perfect surgery. Problems can arise anytime a corneal stromal flap is created, whether the flap is created with a mechanical keratome or a femto-second laser (AMO Intralase or Zeimer Femto LDV). The structural integrity of the cornea can take years to return to 100% tensile strength and some ophthalmologists feel that the cornea may never return to 100% strength after LASIK. For this and other reasons, some patients would prefer not having LASIK. For these patients, ASA is the procedure of choice.

Who needs LASEK or ASA?

Patients who prefer that a keratome not be used during their surgery should chose ASA. To maintain corneal stability over time, it is important to maintain a certain minimum thickness to the cornea. Patients who have corneas that are too thin to maintain this "safe zone" after creating a corneal flap and performing the ablation should have ASA. Those who have had prior lens implant surgery should consider ASA to avoid any risk of dislocating the implant. Patients who are involved in martial arts or boxing should consider ASA.

Who needs the Internal Contact Lens (ICL) surgery or clear lens surgery?

Patients with extreme refractions, more farsighted than + 6.00 and more nearsighted than - 14.00 may need ICL surgery or clear lens surgery. Patients who have corneas that are to thin for their refractive error to be corrected with LVC and still maintain a minimun safe corneal thickness should consider an ICL.

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